The opening night for an exhibition juried by myself and artist/musician Steve Dye is happening TONIGHT at The LAB in San Francisco. Alas, I won’t be in town to attend it but I was involved in the install process and I’ve heard through sources that the show looks great! Come out to celebrate the over 25 artists included and check it out…

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Code-Switchers
Jurors: Steve Dye and Stephanie Syjuco
The LAB, 2948 16th St @ Capp
San Francisco, CA
http://www.thelab.org

Featuring: Facundo Arganaraz and Nicole Anne Crescenzi, Tim Armstrong, Taha Belal, Terry Berlier, Jan Blythe, Lauren Dicioccio, Claudio Dicochea, Mark Edwards, Ariel Goldberg, Jason Hanasik, Carrie Hott, I, Daughter of Kong, Ace Lehner, Jennifer Little, Sarah Lockhart, Yuki Maruyama, Naomi McCavitt, Klea McKenna, Ranu Mukherjee, Claire Nereim and Julie Cloutier, Kit Rosenberg, Karen Ruenitz, Eric Sidner, Julia Kim Smith and David Beaudouin, James Pitt, Anna Tsouhlarakis, Adrian Van Allen, Melissa Wyman, Eiko Yamamoto, and Aygul Idiyatullina.

Exhibition runs: Sept 17 – Oct 11, 2008
Opening reception: Friday, September 19, 6-9 PM featuring live music by I, Daughter of Kong
Gallery Hours: Wed – Sat, 1-6 PM
Performance evening: Thursday, October 2nd, 8:30 PM: featuring “Pieces of Nine”, an original play directed by Mark Edwards and written by Dylan Latimer which makes use of the internet as a stage; “My Egaugnal”, an experimental video by Aygul Idiyatullina that investigates a longing to find balance between three languages the artist uses in everyday life; and SL Morse – “No Exit by Jean Paul Sartre”, a morse code music performance by Sarah Lockhart in collaboration with Aurora Josephson and Suki O’Kane.

How are contemporary artists dealing with issues of cultural complexity, multiple allegiances, and hybrid forms? How are they communicating these ideas and addressing their audience? Using the metaphor of “code-switching,” a linguistic term referring to the use of more than one language within a single conversation, this juried exhibition investigates a variety of approaches to cultural and material bilingualisms, (mis)translations, appropriations, and the purposeful misuse of “proper” communication codes.

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